Turn "They Should" into "I Will"

 
 

We all say it: "They should make..." - We all

I've said it plenty of times:

"They should make an app to track your sleep." - Me (woah FitBit!)

"They should make an app to track how much you spend on booze." - Me (aloha Mint.com!)

Little did I know, groups of people (they) were already working on solutions like this or have done so since. I don't claim that I would have been capable of creating such a beautiful or simple service as Mint.com, but I could have certainly tried.

There is the key phrase...

I could have tried.

In some cases, I wish I had. No one enjoys that feeling. Here's how we can end it.

Over time I've developed a heuristic to use. Every time I catch myself saying or thinking, "they should make blah with blahs!", I stop.

I think:

  • Who is "they"?
  • Why are they able to make "blah"?
  • Can I make "blah"? - OR - do I know people that can help me?
  • Would I be happy making "blah" - OR - could I make money making "blah"?
  • Could "blah" help a lot of people?

Excuse the excessive blahs, but if you can answer "YES!" to the final three, good. I hereby challenge you.

Replace "They should", with "I will".

Then go for it! At the very minimum, write it down.

This helps if you're an entrepreneur, trying to become one, or even working for someone else. I first started thinking this way at SpaceX, although I didn't realize it at the time. It was through this that I was able to have some degree of impact at the company. Why? Because it helped me step out of my own perception of what I thought I was "allowed" to do and enter a whole new world. It was exhilarating.

I've been using it ever since then. The current project I am working on was born out of it (more to come on that later).

Try it for yourself, and let me know how it goes.

 

Note: Of course, this is an overly simplified model. There is a lot to be written about the steps between ideas and execution, but those could be whole books themselves. However, this is a good way to get in the right mindset.

Jake BowlesComment